Providence Healthcare
Providence Healthcare

FAQs

How do I apply to the Houses of Providence?

You must first contact the Community Care Access Centre that serves the area where you live. In Ontario, it is their mandate to initiate applications, determine eligibility for long term care, coordinate applications to selected homes, and manage the wait list for the homes. 

What is the length of your waiting list?

Our waiting list is maintained and managed by the Community Care Access Centre, as are all long-term care home wait lists in Ontario. Due to the number of factors involved in placement, we are unable to give approximate wait times. Placement on the wait list is only one factor considered when looking at admission to an available bed.

How many beds are there at the Houses of Providence?

We have 288 beds in the Houses – 176 of those beds are private and the remaining 112 offer basic accommodation with two residents per room.

What is the cost of nursing home accommodation in the Houses?

Accommodation rates are set by the provincial government’s Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. 

What happens if I cannot afford to pay the accommodation fee?

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care will subsidize those residents in a basic room (a room with two beds) whose income is less than the established rate for basic accommodation. There is no government subsidy for a private room. Residents must apply for a rate reduction by submitting to Providence Healthcare their most recent Notice of Assessment from Revenue Canada as proof of income. In order for the subsidy to start from day one, the application must be completed in the same month as the admission takes place.

What is the nursing care ratio of service in the Houses?

The nursing staff to resident ratio varies by shift with more staff working during the times when residents are the busiest. Each day, registered nurses are available around the clock and registered practical nurses work on the day and evening shifts. The number of resident assistants (trained personal support workers) is 1 to 9 during the day shift, 1 to 12 during the evening shift and 1 to 18 during the night shift. There are also other support staff in place over the day and evening shifts to offer activation and other therapeutic programs in addition to the staff of the nursing department. Funding for nursing staff is paid by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and the amount we receive is controlled by the provincial government.

What is meant by the name ‘Houses’ of Providence?

The Houses of Providence is divided into 16 smaller communities of 18 residents accommodated in each – this is a ‘House’ and each isnamed after a tree that grows in Canada. Each House has its own living room and dining room dedicated to residents living in that area of the building.

Do you admit couples to the Houses?

Yes. In fact, there are couples residing in the Houses at this time. Some live in the same room, while others live in separate rooms but visit each other. Whether the pair resides together depends on cognitive status, level of care and accommodation preferences.

Can my family visit me periodically?

Absolutely! Family involvement is actively encouraged and facilitated through flexible visiting hours, active involvement in care planning, special activities and events, and rooms’ availability for special occasions. We have a Family Council, and its special role is to advocate for the wellbeing of residents in every initiative, and particularly for those who have no immediate family to help them personally.

Is there a similar council for residents?

Yes. Each resident is invited to participate in our Residents’ Council. The mandate is to provide a collective voice to issues of concern to all those who live at the Houses, and to get feedback from management on various events and activities.

Are there recreational activities for my loved one?

Yes. There are both large and small group activities that are structured to respond to residents’ interests and abilities. New activities are regularly introduced to ensure that there is variety. We a have team of activation staff who are assigned to each of four floors with a specialized person on the dementia care unit. Activation calendars are found at information centres on all four floors.

What is in place at the Houses of Providence to ensure my loved one will be safe?

Safety is a key focus for all those working in the Houses of Providence. All staff receives training in safety measures such as:

  • How to respond to an emergency such as a fire alarm.
  • Ways to prevent resident falls (e.g. encouraging proper footwear, and transferring residents safely).
  • Preventing the spread of infection (e.g. proper hand hygiene).
  • Proper handling and storage of hazardous materials (e.g. corrosive liquids).
  • How to approach and respond to residents who are upset or confused,
  • Minimizing the use of restraints.
  • Encouraging best practice in providing care.

We also have safety features in the building such as:

  • On site security guards on all shifts, 24 hours per day seven days per week, who respond in the event of any emergency situation and complete scheduled security rounds in the building.
  • Locked entrance after 9:00 p.m. with the front door monitored daily by security staff.
  • An eletronic “wanderguard” system for those residents who would be at risk of injury if they left the building on their own and without someone with them.
  • A health and safety committee that does building inspections and environmental safety audits.